Pooda D9 Review: Another Dyson Clone with a Cord

I’ve been testing some 2-in-1 vacuums over the past few weeks and here’s another one – the Pooda D9. This is a brandnew product from GearBest and we’ll see in the review how good or bad it is.

Unlike the Dibea products I wrote about weeks back, this product comes with a cord. So it has more power. According to GearBest this vacuum has a whopping 12,000 Pa of suction, which is almost twice more than the cordless Dibea C17 (7,000 Pa) and more than twice the Dibea F6 (5,200 Pa).

Here’s the kicker, this product costs half the price of the two Dibea vacuums I mentioned but is it worth buying?

First, let’s look at the features of this vacuum so you’ll know what to expect…

  • High-speed motor that spins 320,000 times per minute
  • 12,000 Pa suction (more than the Dibea C17 and F6)
  • Washable filter and easy to remove dust bin
  • Interchangeable tools and extension wand
  • 7 liter dust bin capacity
  • Motor produces 71 decibels
  • Cyclonic filtration
  • 13 foot power cord
  • 1 year warranty

Pros

  • Powerful motor and strong suction
  • Decent sized bin for a small stick vacuum
  • Bin is easy to empty and clean
  • Versatile machine

Cons

  • Extension wand is pretty crude and does not have any locking mechanism
  • Floor tool will have a tendency to snow plow large piles of dirt
  • No swivel
  • Poor filtration

What to expect from the Pooda D9?

Please watch this video to get a feel on what to expect from this cheap Dyson copycat…

Chinese manufacturers are pretty aggressive these days at copying Dyson. The Pooda D9 is the latest of the long line of products. I must admit, the two Dibea 2-in-1 products I tested were better than expected.

Even if does not match Dyson in terms of sophistication and finish, you can’t argue with the price difference. And this product is much, much cheaper at just $45!

Same Trigger Mechanism as the Dyson

Pooda comes with the same trigger switch found in the Dyson. The biggest difference is that Pooda has a locking mechanism that will not require you to constantly squeeze the trigger.

This means less strain on your wrists and an easier time cleaning. One downside is the absence of swivel steering that makes it a little more difficult to steer.

Motor

One good thing about having a cord is you can put a more powerful motor. And that is what Pooda did. The 400 watt motor rotates at a very fast 320,000 revolutions per minute. This in turn helps this machine have 12,000 Pa of suction.

But you won’t have the freedom of a cordless and you’ll be limited by the 13 foot cord.

Cyclonic Filtration

Pooda says that their product uses cyclonic filtration. If you’re not familiar with this technology – it’s a technology designed to keep dirt away from the filters. The better the cyclonic filtration, the less you need to clean the filters because it will keep dirt away.

The problem with the Pooda is that the cyclone molding you see on top are just for show. There aren’t exactly any cyclones in it so do not expect this to have the same level of filtration. But the good news is they designed it such that it’s easy to take apart and clean.

You’ll just have to clean it more often – that’s the bad news.

Dirt Bin

Despite utilizing the same design as the Dyson, Pooda has a decent sized bin at around 0.7 liters. What I like about the design is that it’s easy to disassemble.

And it can hold more than the 0.7 liter capacity advertised. If you watch the whole video above, the amount of dirt on the floor was more than 0.7 and it was able to pick it up easy.

Tools

It comes with a couple of tools – a combination brush and crevice tool plus the main floor tool.

The latter does not have any motorized brush but thanks to the sheer power of the motor it was able to pick up a lot of dirt on carpet.

Filtration

Unfortunately, the D9 does not come with any HEPA filtration. What it has is a 2-stage foam + micro-weave cotton filter that Pooda says is has antibacterial properties.

From my cleaning tests, you will need to wash these filters often because the cyclonic filtration doesn’t do a good enough job keeping dirt away from it.

Bare Floor Cleaning

First let me show you a couple of photos before my commentary.

The first cleaning test I did was with this big pile of mess that consists of rolled oats, powder, dust, hair, etc.

Next up powder, baby powder to be more specific…

Despite the strong suction, the floor tool is not built for cleaning large chunks of dirt. You may be able to clean dust and some hair but not large piles of rolled oats.

It literally snow plowed nearly everything in sight. The Dibea C17 that has nearly half-less power did a superior job on bare floor.

When I tried this on powder, it did not pick up as well as I’d expected.

Carpet Cleaning

Surprisingly, Pooda did a much better job cleaning carpet than bare floor. Just check out this before and after photo…

After just one back and forth pass, Pooda was able to pick up a lot of surface dirt thanks to the sheer power of the motor. Unfortunately it lacks a motorized brush tool so don’t expect this to be a deep cleaner.

This will not work on anything more than thin pile carpet or rug like the one I tested it on.

Upholstery Cleaning

The only tool available to clean up upholstery is the combination brush and crevice tool. Pooda does not have a mini turbo brush that would have been great at cleaning up hair on fabric. So this would only be useful at picking up loosen dirt.

But suction should be enough for cleaning most tasks.

Product Specification

ModelD9
AttachmentsCombo crevice and brush tool

Main cleaning head (no motorized brush)
LED headlight
No
Brush roll on/off
No
Cord length
13 feet
Net weight
3.12
Shipping weight
9.8 pounds
Cleaning path
8.15"
Overall length
N/A
Filter type
Washable
Dust capacity
0.7 liters
Power
12,000 Pa
Manufactured in
China
Warranty
1 year

Where can I buy this?

You can buy this from GearBest for a low, low price of $45.99. It’s one of the cheapest stick vacuums I’ve seen so far.

To Wrap It Up

When I first saw this product online, I had high hopes for this product. Unfortunately, the poor design of the floor tool limits the cleaning potential of this machine. Even with that much power on tap, it wasn’t able to clean on bare floor well enough.

The two extension wands also are another weak point. It does not have any locking feature and only held on by friction. There’s a big risk of it cracking during the long haul if you’re not careful attaching and detaching it.

And it lacks a swivel feature that should make moving this around much easier. The low price of this product is tempting but I’d suggest you stay away for now until Pooda comes up with a better performing product. If you’re looking for something like a Dyson on the cheap then go with either the Dibea C17 or F6 – these two will perform much better.

Garrick Dee
 

Garrick is the founder of the Cordless Vacuum Guide that originally focused on cordless vacuums but he has now expanded to reviewing corded vacuums and carpet cleaners to be able to provide a more complete guide in terms of choosing the right cleaner.

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