Best Robot Vacuums for Hardwood Floors [Comparison 8 Different Options]

Best Robot Vacuum for Hardwood Floors

Cleaning hardwood floors isn’t as daunting as carpets, but it can be tedious.

Using a broom isn’t very efficient, and a stick vacuum requires some effort.

One way to automate the process is using a robot vacuum, and we’ll look at the best options for hardwood floors (or hard floors).

The benchmark for selecting robot vacuums on this surface is different from on carpet, and we’ll look at what to look for below.

Please note that the options here are robots I’ve tested.

There are robots I haven’t tested but are in the pipeline, like the Wyze robot vacuum and Roborock Q5+, but once I’ve finished reviewing them, I’ll update this list.

Best Robot Vacuum + Mop Hybrid Options

Premium robot vacuums for hardwood floors

The first group we’ll look at is robot vacuum and mop hybrids. These options are the most versatile on this list with their two-in-one functionality.

Technology has gotten to a point where these options are viable.

Unlike the early options with gravity tanks, the products utilize electronic tanks that offer more water deployment control.

The latest options have pad cleaning features to enhance autonomy and usability to consumers further.

Roborock’s latest release, the Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra, has both pad washing and self-emptying features.

What separates it from most other options in this list are the efficiency of the pad-washing and self-emptying mechanisms.

The back and forth motion and the stiff brush effectively clean the mopping cloth.

Ecovacs has a similar product (DEEBOT X1), utilizing two spinning discs and a ribbed base plate to clean the pad.

Although I haven’t tested it, I’ve reviewed a similar product, the Dreame Bot W10, and the ribbed base won’t be as efficient.

The Roborock S5 Max is the least expensive option, but it doesn’t have the premium features like pad washing or self-emptying.

It’s the most basic of the alternatives on this list, but it’s the least expensive.

The subsequent Roborock product releases have relegated this model to the near entry-level range, so budget-conscious shoppers should consider it.

Realize that these options are great for sealed hardwood surfaces but not for unsealed since liquid residue will seep through the pores and damage

Pad-Washing + Self-Emptying: Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra

Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra
  • Airflow: 13.39 CFM
  • Sand on Hard Flooring: 99.6%
  • Navigation: LIDAR + Front-facing camera
  • Self-empty: Yes
  • Bag capacity: 2.5-liters
  • Clean water tank capacity: 3-liters
  • Dirty water tank capacity: 2.5-liters
  • Map saving: Yes
  • Number of maps: 4
  • Containment: Yes
  • Selective Room cleaning: Yes
  • Recharge & Resume: Yes
  • Brush roll: Twin rubber extractors
  • Dustbin capacity: 400ml
  • Mopping: Yes
  • Water tank capacity (inside robot): 200ml
  • Type: N/A
  • Side brush: One
  • Battery: 5200 mAh Li-ion
  • Run time: 180 minutes
  • Noise: 72.9 dB

Cheaper Self-Emptying Option: Roborock S7+

Roborock S7 with Auto Empty Dock
  • Airflow: 13.91 CFM
  • Sand on hard floor: 99.8%
  • Navigation: LIDAR
  • Mopping: Yes
  • Auto empty: Yes
  • Bag capacity: 3-liters
  • Clean water tank capacity: N/A
  • Dirty water tank capacity: N/A
  • Navigation: LIDAR & SLAM
  • Map saving: Yes
  • Number of maps: 4
  • Containment: Yes
  • Selective room cleaning: Yes
  • Recharge & Resume: Yes
  • Dustbin capacity: 420ml
  • Water tank (inside robot): 300ml
  • Side brush: One
  • Battery: 5200 mAh Li-ion
  • Run time: 180 mins
  • Noise: 69.8 dB

Self-washing Option: Dreame Bot W10

Dreame Bot W10
  • Airflow: 17.91 CFM
  • Sand on hard floor: 99.5%
  • Navigation: LIDAR
  • Mopping: Yes
  • Auto empty: No
  • Pad washing: Yes
  • Bag capacity: N/A
  • Clean water tank capacity: 4.01 liters (1.06 gallons)
  • Dirty water tank capacity: 4.01 liters (1.06 gallons)
  • Navigation: LIDAR & SLAM
  • Map saving: Yes
  • Number of maps: 4
  • Containment: Yes
  • Selective room cleaning: Yes
  • Recharge & Resume: Yes
  • Dustbin capacity: 450ml
  • Water tank: 300ml
  • Side brush: One
  • Battery: 5200 mAh Li-ion
  • Run time: 180 mins
  • Noise: 69.8 dB

Cheapest Option: Roborock S5 Max

  • Airflow: 17.74 CFM
  • Sand on hard floor: 99.8%
  • Navigation: LIDAR
  • Mopping: Yes
  • Auto empty: No
  • Pad washing: No
  • Bag capacity: N/A
  • Clean water tank capacity: N/A
  • Dirty water tank capacity: N/A
  • Navigation: LIDAR & SLAM
  • Map saving: Yes
  • Number of maps: 4
  • Containment: Yes
  • Selective room cleaning: Yes
  • Recharge & Resume: Yes
  • Dustbin capacity: 460ml
  • Water tank: 290ml
  • Side brush: One
  • Battery: 5200 mAh Li-ion
  • Run time: 180 mins
  • Noise: 62.4 dB

* If you click this link and purchase, we earn a commission at no additional cost to you.

Budget Options with a Self-Emptying Base

Budget robot vacuums for hardwood floors

Next, we’ll look at budget auto-empty robot vacuum options. Some of these models will have a mopping feature, but not as good as the options above.

The best option for me on this surface is the Yeedi Vac Station. It’s one of the least expensive options, but with high-end cleaning performance, at least on hard floors.

A cheaper option is the Shark IQ with the auto-empty base station.

It’s one of a handful of options with a bagless self-emptying system (outside the Roborock S7+ in European markets).

The Shark IQ isn’t as feature-rich as Yeedi, but its price makes it compelling, and I’m talking about the refurbished option.

However, the price of a brand new IQ series is closer to the mid-price range.

Best Budget Option w/ Self-Emptying Base: Yeedi Vac Station

Yeedi Vac Station
  • Airflow: 23 CFM
  • Sand on Hard Flooring: 99.5%
  • Navigation: Top Camera + Gyroscope
  • Self-empty: Yes
  • Bag capacity: 2.5-liters
  • Map saving: Yes
  • Number of maps: 1
  • Containment: Yes
  • Selective Room cleaning: Yes
  • Recharge & Resume: Yes
  • Brush roll: Combo brush
  • Dustbin capacity: 420ml
  • Mopping: Yes
  • Water tank capacity (inside robot): 240ml
  • Type: Electronic
  • Side brush: One
  • Battery: 5200 mAh Li-ion
  • Run time: 200 minutes
  • Noise: 64.9 dB

Bagless Option: Shark IQ

  • Airflow: 18.87 CFM
  • Sand on Hard Flooring: 97.3%
  • Navigation: Top Camera + Gyroscope
  • Self-empty: Yes
  • Bag capacity: No bag (1.8-liter capacity)
  • Map saving: Yes
  • Number of maps: 1
  • Containment: Yes
  • Selective Room cleaning: No
  • Recharge & Resume: Yes
  • Brush roll: Combo brush
  • Dustbin capacity: 400ml
  • Mopping: Yes
  • Water tank capacity (inside robot): N/A
  • Type: N/A
  • Side brush: One
  • Battery: Li-ion
  • Run time: 60 minutes
  • Noise: 64.8 dB

Robot Vacuum Only Options

Robot vacuum only options for hardwood floors

This next set of robots doesn’t have any special features – no auto-empty base station, pad washing, or mopping features.

If you’re looking for a robot vacuum option without the bells and whistles, any of these options will be excellent.

The Roborock S4 Max is the best option for this category because of its high-end hardwood performance and close-to-budget-level price.

It’s one of the best value options, picking up one of the highest percentages of sand on this surface.

There’s no need to spend a premium for a high airflow robot like the Roomba S9+ to get this level of performance.

The next option is the Roomba 980, an older Roomba option.

iRobot no longer sells this variant on their site, but it’s still available in online stores like Amazon.

It’s one of two high airflow Roombas (the other is the Roomba S9+), and high airflow equates well to hardwood cleaning performance.

The Roomba 980 picked up 100% of sand on this surface and is the only option on this list with that percentage.

I didn’t include the S9+ because of its high price tag, and it didn’t offer as much value as the cheaper alternatives.

And even if the Roomba 980 doesn’t have a self-emptying feature, its price has dropped to near budget levels, making it an enticing option.

The downside of the Roomba 980 is its inefficiency compared to the S4 Max.

It doesn’t traverse around tight areas as smoothly, and the navigation is more aggressive, meaning it’ll bump into obstacles harder.

But its high airflow makes it ideal on hard floors because of its efficiency.

The twin rubber extractors (though using the older version) have high-end debris pick up, plus it has dirt detect, so it does extra passes on dirtier zones.

Roborock S4 Max

Roborock S4 Max
  • Airflow: 22.26 CFM
  • Sand on Hard Flooring: 99.9%
  • Navigation: LIDAR
  • Self-empty: No
  • Bag capacity: N/A
  • Map saving: Yes
  • Number of maps: 4
  • Containment: Yes
  • Selective Room cleaning: Yes
  • Recharge & Resume: Yes
  • Brush roll: Combo brush
  • Dustbin capacity: 460ml
  • Mopping: No
  • Water tank capacity (inside robot): N/A
  • Type: N/A
  • Side brush: One
  • Battery: 5200 mAh Li-ion
  • Run time: 180 minutes
  • Noise: 64.1 dB

Roomba 980

  • Airflow: 19.74 CFM
  • Sand on Hard Flooring: 100%
  • Navigation: Visual SLAM
  • Self-empty: No
  • Bag capacity: N/A
  • Map saving: Yes
  • Number of maps: 10
  • Containment: Yes
  • Selective Room cleaning: Yes
  • Recharge & Resume: Yes
  • Brush roll: Combo brush
  • Dustbin capacity: 600ml
  • Mopping: No
  • Water tank capacity (inside robot): N/A
  • Type: N/A
  • Side brush: One
  • Battery: 3600 mAh Li-ion
  • Run time: 120 minutes
  • Noise: 74.2 dB

How to Choose the Best Robot Vacuum on Hardwood Floors?

Cleaning hardwood floors isn’t as challenging as carpet, but it’s tedious.

My default recommendation is to use a stick vacuum with a soft roller nozzle,  but that too takes time to complete.

However, not everyone has the time to vacuum every single day, and this is where a robot vacuum is helpful.

Ask me ten years ago, I wouldn’t recommend any robot vacuum for this task, but fast forward, these machines are viable options to clean hardwood floors, even exclusively.

Navigation, battery, and navigation technology have improved so much that these products can function autonomously without much human intervention.

But the question is, which robot vacuum is best suited for this surface? I’ll help you with some questions you’ll need to answer.

1. How much are you willing to spend?

The step is to determine the budget. How much are you willing to spend on a robot vacuum? Is it $200? $300? $400? $500 or more?

I mention this as a first step, so you don’t waste time looking at options out of your price bracket.

2. Do you need a self-emptying base?

Roborock S7 vs Ecovacs N8 Pro auto empty dock design

Since iRobot introduced the Roomba I7+, self-emptying robot vacuums have gained popularity.

More brands have incorporated this technology like Roborock, Dreame, Ecovacs, etc.

This feature empties the robot’s dustbin after every run and saves consumers time because it’s an automated process.

3. Do you need a mopping feature?

Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra dirty pad

Many non-Roomba and non-Neato brands have two-in-one hybrids that can mop and vacuum simultaneously.

The latest models use electronic water tanks, giving consumers more control over water disbursement.

Unlike gravity tanks, where water continually drips, electronic water tanks don’t and only release liquid if the consumer turns on the mopping feature through the app.

4. How big is your home?

Lastly, how big is your home? Is it a small apartment complex or a huge mansion?

You can save money purchasing a cheaper random navigating robot like the Roomba 694 in small spaces.

But I wouldn’t recommend it inside larger homes. 

If you live in a large home, the no-brainer option would be an intelligent robot vacuum that can track its location.

Unfortunately, the premium options are costly. The good news is these new releases have pushed the prices of older variants down.

For example, the S5 Max was once priced in the high mid-level range and now is closer to the budget category.

Must-Have Features

Next, we’ll look at the must-have features. These are elements to look for in a robot vacuum that’ll clean hard floors.

High airflow isn’t as high on the priority list like a robot vacuum for carpet.

A good brush design is critical with debris pick-up on this surface, the first aspect.

1. Good brush roll design

Roborock S7 MaxV brush roll

Agitation is critical in cleaning hardwood floors, but the question is, how do you determine a good brush roll design?

I’ve tested many robot vacuums running this blog over the past ten years, so I understand which brands make good brush roll designs.

Two of the best are Roborock and Roomba with their bristle-less designs, namely the S7, S7 MaxV, and the Roomba counter-rotating extractors.

Roomba 980 rollers out

Robots with a combo brush also will do well.

2. Decent airflow

I mentioned that airflow isn’t as crucial on hardwood as on carpets, but having enough is essential for debris pick up, especially cleaning crevices.

A good example would be the Roomba 980. It’s iRobot’s second-highest airflow robot and had one of the highest cleaning test scores.

There are exceptions like the Roomba S7 and S7 MaxV, but it’s offset by the brush roll design that picked up well.

3. Intelligent Navigation

Another critical factor is navigation. I mentioned (earlier) purchasing a random navigating robot to save money in tiny homes.

However, with the influx of third-party brands, prices have gone down.

Navigation is an essential consideration for robot vacuums as it’ll dictate how efficient (or not) it’ll pick up debris.

There are two main types of intelligent robot vacuums – the SLAM and VSLAM.

SLAM robots utilize LIDAR (or a laser distance sensor) and offer better precision thanks to the laser sensor.

VSLAM relies on a top-mounted camera and optical sensors to determine its location.

One difference is that the camera sensor is heavily reliant on light, while a laser isn’t.

LIDAR robots are also typically more efficient thanks to the laser sensor’s precision.

These products finish the coverage experiments in the least time versus camera-based robots.

There’s less hesitation and more decisiveness with their algorithms. 

Intelligent navigating robots also have recharge and resume, which is gold inside large homes since it resumes cleaning if it doesn’t finish previously.

4. Containment

Roborock S7 MaxV containment

The next must-have feature is containment. Most new robots have a form of containment in their apps – either invisible walls or no-go zones.

An invisible wall blocks a robot from going past it, essentially acting as a wall, but virtually through the app.

No-go zones prevent the robot from entering a specific area drawn on the map.

5. Scheduling

The main point of a robot vacuum is autonomy, and if there’s no way of scheduling clean-ups, what’s the point of purchasing one?

Scheduling enables consumers to automate the vacuuming process, and the influx of self-emptying robots further enhances their autonomy.

Nice to have features

Next, we’ll look at the nice to have but non-essential features.

1. Obstacle Avoidance

Roborock S7 MaxV ReactiveAI 2.0

One of the options above (the S7 MaxV Ultra) has obstacle avoidance technology, helping it detect and evade objects.

It’s an example of how far robot vacuum technology has gone from humble beginnings.

However, I don’t think it’s an essential feature as it’s not foolproof as most obstacle-avoiding robots don’t avoid everything well.

The best I’ve tested so far is the Roomba J7+ and the Roborock S7 MaxV.

Best Washing + Self-Emptying: Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra

Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra base station and robot

Pros

  • Most autonomous option with the pad-washing and self-emptying features
  • Same high-end cleaning performance as the Roborock S7+
  • Easy access to the water tanks and bag
  • The pad-washing feature is surprisingly effective at cleaning the mop cloth.
  • The second-best obstacle avoiding robot option after the Roomba J7+

Cons

  • Ultra expensive
  • Bulky base station

At the top of this list is the S7 MaxV Ultra, Roborock’s latest and (perhaps) its best product to date.

It combines the best attributes of various Roborock options like the obstacle avoidance feature of the S6 MaxV, this S7’s VibraRise feature, and the self-emptying features.

The dual function base station isn’t the first, but I believe it’s one of the best at their respective tasks.

It’s better than the Dreame Bot W10 and Narwal T10 at cleaning the pad.

Roborock brought back the obstacle avoidance feature with laser sensors, and an LED to enhance it.

It’s much better than the S6 MaxV at avoiding objects, stuff like pet feces, and coiled wires.

This variant also retains the same VibraRise mopping element and bristle-less brush, so it’ll have the same vacuuming performance as the S7+.

Overall, the Roborock S7 MaxV is an excellent option for people looking for an efficient robot vacuum that can vacuum and mop floors autonomously.

The pad washing and self-cleaning features are excellent and help keep floors clean without much intervention.

Cheaper Self-Emptying Robot: Roborock S7+

Roborock S7 auto empty dock

Pros

  • Cheaper than the Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra
  • A more compact base station
  • Efficient at vacuuming and mopping floors
  • Large 3-liter bag capacity
  • The bristle-less brush is superb at picking up heavy debris

Cons

  • Still an expensive option
  • Weaker airflow than other options here

The S7 MaxV’s predecessor is the next best option if you don’t want to spend a premium on it.

It offers a similar vacuuming and mopping performance without the pad-washing feature.

One plus of not having this extra convenience is the smaller base station.

You can see the size difference in the photo above.

The Roborock S7+ possesses many of the same features as the S7 MaxV, minus the pad washing feature.

Both have nearly identical cleaning test scores, airflow scores, etc. So there’s not much variance, except for the S7 MaxV’s bulkier base station capable of cleaning the pad.

If you want something cheaper but with the same efficiency, cleaning, and mopping performance, go for this option.

Self-Washing Option: Dreame Bot W10

Pros

  • Excellent vacuuming performance thanks to the high airflow
  • Efficient navigational algorithm
  • The base station cleans the pads after the mopping cycle
  • Large capacity clean and dirty water tanks
  • It can mop and vacuum simultaneously

Cons

  • Huge base station
  • Expensive
  • No self-emptying feature

The next product we’ll look at is the Dreame Bot W10, which possesses similar qualities to the S7 MaxV, but without the self-emptying feature.

This robot is in the same category as the Narwal T10, self-washing robots with two rotating discs.

But the W10 is better than Narwal because it can vacuum and mop simultaneously.

It also has a better app since it utilizes the Xiaomi home app.

These rotating discs provide enough agitation to clean stains, but they won’t pick up liquid, so that I wouldn’t recommend it on wet spills.

The rotating discs are in a similar location as the S7 MaxV – behind the brush so that it can do both tasks simultaneously.

Its high airflow is another pro, enabling it to vacuum debris well, especially on hardwood surfaces.

This combination is a huge reason why I put it on my shortlist.

Several downsides include the massive base station housing clean and dirty water tanks.

Another con is the pad cleaning mechanism that isn’t as efficient as the Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra at cleaning the pads.

It uses a tray with a ribbed surface for agitation, which pales compared to the brush mechanism used by Roborock.

Budget Option with Self-Emptying Base Station: Yeedi Vac Station

Yeedi Vac Station with Auto-Empty Dock

Pros

  • Perhaps the best budget self-emptying robot vacuum option
  • High airflow equates to high-end hardwood cleaning performance
  • Low profile design will fit underneath furniture with three inches of clearance
  • One of the more efficient camera-based intelligent robot vacuums

Cons

  • Subpar mopping feature
  • It may not function as efficiently in dim or pitch-black areas

Not many online reviews recommend the Yeedi Vac Station, but its cleaning performance can’t be overlooked.

It recorded one of the higher airflow scores – a significant reason why it picked up well on this surface.

I’ve had my apprehensions before testing this product because it relies on a camera sensor, but it was efficient even around tight quarters.

It didn’t have hesitation issues with Roomba products and didn’t bump into furniture hard.

One plus with using a camera instead of LIDAR is the reduced vertical footprint.

This robot is shorter than any of the LIDAR robots I’ve tested and will fit under lower clearance furniture better.

If this is a consideration and you don’t want to spend a premium on a robot vacuum, consider this option.

Airflow Comparison

While airflow isn’t as crucial on hardwood surfaces, it’s still an indicator of how well a robot vacuum performs on carpets, especially with heavier debris.

Here’s a rundown of each variant’s airflow levels in each power setting.

Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra

  • Quiet: 7.97 CFM
  • Balanced: 8.71 CFM
  • Turbo: 9.8 CFM
  • Max: 12.49 CFM
  • Max+: 13.39 CFM

Roborock S7+

  • Quiet: 8.2 CFM
  • Balanced: 9.68 CFM
  • Turbo: 11.33 CFM
  • Max: 13.91 CFM

Dreame Bot W10

  • Quiet: 8.33 CFM
  • Standard: 10.24 CFM
  • Strong: 13.2 CFM
  • Turbo: 17.91 CFM

Roborock S5 Max

  • Quiet: 9.8 CFM
  • Balanced: 12.49 CFM
  • Turbo: 15.68 CFM
  • Max: 17.74 CFM

Yeedi Vac Station

  • Standard: 19.74 CFM
  • Max: 19.74 CFM
  • Max+: 23 CFM

Shark IQ

  • Eco: 14.87 CFM
  • Normal: 14.87 CFM
  • Max: 18.87 CFM

Roborock S4 Max

  • Quiet: 11.95 CFM
  • Normal: 15.33 CFM
  • Turbo: 18.87 CFM
  • Max: 22.26 CFM

Roomba 980

  • Eco: 13.74 CFM
  • Performance: 19.74 CFM

The Yeedi Vac Station and Roborock S4 Max had the highest airflow results and were among the best options for cleaning sand, which isn’t surprising with the high airflow.

The Roomba 980 had the best results on sand because of the dirt detect feature plus the counter-rotating extractors.

Other outliers are the Roborock S7 and S7 MaxV Ultra, picking up in the high 90s (sand) despite the low airflow.

The efficient navigation and high-end agitation allow both to pick up heavy debris even with the airflow limitations. 

Cleaning Comparison

Next, we’ll look at how well these robots compare to cleaning hardwood floors (or hard floors).

ModelOverallHard FloorsSand on Hard Floor
Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra99.77%99.95%99.6%
Roborock S7+99.75%99.7%99.8%
Dreame Bot W1099.62%99.75%99.5%
Roborock S5 Max99.9%100%99.8%
Yeedi Vac Station99.17%98.85%99.5%
Shark IQ97.77%98.25%97.3%
Roborock S4 Max99.8%99.7%99.9%
Roomba 98099.67%99.35%100%

The best options are mostly Roborock products, which isn’t surprising since of their excellent brush roll design and decent airflow.

Surprisingly, the Roborock S5 Max had the best average (99.9%), followed by the S4 Max (99.8%) and S7 MaxV Ultra (99.77%).

The best non-Roborock option is the Roomba 980 (99.67%).

Regardless, the beauty of these options is that all are excellent at picking up dust, even in the lower settings.

Hair Wrap Comparison

Another important consideration is how well these products clean hair. I used five and seven-inch strands to check how much these products pick up.

Model5"7"
Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra100%63%
Roborock S7+75%44%
Dreame Bot W1082%53%
Roborock S5 Max95%48%
Yeedi Vac Station87%35%
Shark IQ99%36%
Roborock S4 Max80%80%
Roomba 98098%98%

I believe this is a good barometer of how well a robot vacuum fares against human and pet hair.

Most of these options are excellent at picking up shorter five-inch strands, most getting above 75% (one+ grams), which is an excellent score.

However, the results with longer seven-inch strands will vary. The best options are the Roborock S4 Max, Roomba 980, and Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra.

The first two weren’t surprising since both possess the highest airflow of the bunch.

Spec Comparison

Model
Roborock S7 MaxV Ultra
Roborock S7+
Dreame Bot W10
Roborock S5 Max
Yeedi Vac Station
Shark IQ
Roborock S4 Max
Roomba 980
Width
13.89"
13.8"
12.36"
13.8"
13.77"
12.8"
13.8"
13.5"
Height
3.79"
3.8"
4.15"
3.8"
3.03"
3..5"
3.8"
3.6"
Navigation
LIDAR
LIDAR
LIDAR
LIDAR
Camera + Optical
Camera + Optical
LIDAR
Camera + Optical
Run time
180 mins.
180 mins.
180 mins.
180 mins.
200 mins.
60 mins.
180 mins.
120 mins.
Recharge and Resume
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Map Saving
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Number of Maps
4
4
3
N/A
1
1
4
10
Dustbin capacity
400 ml
420 ml
450 ml
460 ml
420 ml
400 ml
460 ml
500 ml
Water tank (in robot)
200 ml
300 ml
N/A
297 ml
240 ml
N/A
N/A
N/A
Clean water tank
3-liters
N/A
1.06 gallons
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Dirty water tank
2.5-liters
N/A
1.06 gallons
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Auto empty capacity
2.4-liters
3-liters
N/A
N/A
2.4-liters
1.8-liters
N/A
N/A
Airflow
13.39 CFM
13.91 CFM
17.91 CFM
17.74 CFM
23 CFM
18.87 CFM
22.26 CFM
19.74
CFM
Noise
72.9 dB
69.8 dB
70.3 dB
62.4 dB
64.9 dB
64.8 dB
64.1 dB
74.2 dB
Warranty
1-yr
1-yr
1-yr
1-yr
1-yr
1-yr
1-yr
1-year limited
Price

Where can I buy these robots?

You can purchase these robot vacuums from online stores like Amazon. Check the links below for the latest pricing information.

Disclaimer: I will earn a commission if you purchase through the link above, but at no extra cost to you, so it’s a win-win for us!

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